Knocking Down the Pins: CTS Training Simplified

Huh, sometimes I even amaze myself…

My boy, K.Wags, thinks that folks use the term “amazing” far too often. I don’t really disagree, but I’m convinced the analogy that I came up with in class last week fits all the criterion.Amazing

Surprise? Well, let’s be honest, the ensuing words of wisdom came directly from me, so…

Wonder? Wonder? More like WONDERFUL. Stay with me here; I have come up with an astounding, startling and breathtaking “Tale to Astonish” which compares our training model in the Counterpoint Tactical System (CTS) to a brand new version of bowling that would totally be totally fun and easy to learn.

Our staff at Haastyle Martial Arts Academy, and, really, all of us teaching and training CTS throughout the country, are very proud of, and love to pontificate about, our open training model, as set forth by our leader Zach Whitson, the creator of the system. This model provides for progressive resistance as one develops specific ‘attributes’ necessary for street survival and growth in the system. For example, at the beginning level, we train a set of passing drills that are fundamental to the application of CTS in the real world. Later, we develop a set of locks and takedowns that can plug directly into the passing drills when trained correctly. At the advanced level, we will train more advanced interceptions, enhancements, and counter attacks that will come in handy after students have committed to years of maturation and evolution in the system. This got me to thinking…

I imagined an AMAZING new game, something that will take your little ant-sized CTS game and expand it to a GIANT game…

Tales_to_Astonish_Vol_1_49 (2)

Prepare to be ASTONISHED by an AMAZING analogy of how your development in the Counterpoint Tactical System can work:

Imagine the game of bowling and it’s system of strikes and spares for increased scoring opportunities. In the traditional version, a perfect score of 300 is achieved by knocking all the pins down on every throw. Ten frames, twelve consecutive strikes wiping out all the pins. That is 120 pins in total for those scoring at home. Through the magics and trickery of how the score is kept in bowling, this equals 300 (#obviously).

Go Mike!

Wally-300

#Codyisaloser

 

This strikes me (#punintended) as a difficult way to learn to accomplish a ‘perfect’ affectation of the idea of knocking down ten pins. I would rather get great at knocking down one pin first, then two, and so on. Take it on faith that if I knocked down one, then two, then three, etc. finishing with three strikes in the tenth frame, that cumulative score would add up to 75, for knocking down 75 pins. Makes sense, right? This is a common score for your average seven-year-old league bowler?!?!?! What if the game was set up with one pin in the first frame? Knock it down and it counts as a strike (a ‘perfect’ accomplishment); in the second frame there are two pins and knocking them both down counts as a ‘perfect’ strike, and so on. Now, by knocking down the same 75 pins, you have achieved the ‘perfect’ (300) score.

Go you! (the CTS practitioner)

300

Master Z, as the founder and primary promoter of the CTS method, asks us all to pick up an ever increasing load. So does your boss, your spouse, and so do your kids. That’s how the world works. If you want it to be real, guess what, it’s gonna get harder (#yourewelcome). In turn, your accomplishments will have more value.

So, it’s pretty much understood that the most difficult part of training is getting started. Many think they have to accomplish everything right away, rolling perfect strikes every time. What I’m saying to all you new players out there is, take it one frame at a time and keep knockin’em down.

Hmmm, what if I actually trained to hit someone with a bowling ball?

See you on the mat! RH

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